Courage to Walk the Razor’s Edge

“To dare is to lose one’s footing temporarily. To not dare is to lose oneself.” – Soren Kierkegaard

The chorus of Jana Stanfield’s and Jimmy Scott’s song, “If I Were Brave”, describes the razor’s edge as the place “fools and dreamers dare to tread.” Those who always keep their feet planted safely upon the ground would probably agree.

I would submit that it is more foolish to avoid the razor’s edge because of a fear of failing. You cannot avoid failure without avoiding success. Virtually all of the great achievements in human history are the result of walking the razor’s edge. Every technological or social advance was achieved because someone took a personal or professional risk.

“The skeptic sees risky endeavors as resulting in either success or failure, as if the two were polar opposites. The intelligent person knows that failure is part of the process of success, and that both lie in the same direction, opposite cowardice.” – Steve Pavlina

How you view failure can play a significant roll in how close to the edge you are willing to live and work. For the optimistic risk-taker, failure is not something to fear because it puts you one step closer to success.

Norman Croucher is an accomplished mountain climber despite having lost both his legs in a railway accident. In 1981, his left artificial leg broke while climbing in Argentina. The mishap proved useful because it prompted Mr. Croucher to get a designer to make a better kind of artificial leg.

If you accept a limiting belief, then it will become a truth for you. ~ Louise Hay

For four thousand years in China, “everyone” accepted that peasants were incapable of learning- until one day a man named Jimmy Yen challenged this belief and started teaching commoners to read and write.

Everyday someone accomplishes something that was once deemed the impossible. If you are not afraid to fail while trying, you can accomplish whatever you have accepted to be within your personal limitations.

“…if the fear and uncertainty of risk are perceived as “the enemy,” then entrepreneurs – if they are to build businesses — must counter the enemy with a set of weapons called optimism and rationalization.”- by Rebecca Smith, A.D. Morgan Corporation

On any given day, more than half of the thoughts of the average person are negative. What’s worse, 80% of those negative thoughts are recycled negative thoughts from the day before. We’re just thinking the same negative thoughts day after day. No wonder so many people are afraid of anything that may help them to progress.

How is it that you can finally find the courage to walk the razor’s edge? The answer is in what you feed your mind. It is just as important to feed your mind with positive words as it is to feed your belly healthy food. I’m not talking about just snacking on books about courage every once in a while. I mean for you to devour positive reinforcement on a daily basis.

Spend as much time as you can reading and listening to motivational materials. Read or listen to biographies about successful people. If you are sick, feed you mind stories of people who have overcome illness. If you are poor, feed your mind stories of people who have overcome poverty. Constantly feed your mind until you come to understand and accept that although there will be failures along the way, success is a NORMAL consequence to risk-taking. This is what will give you the courage to walk the razor’s edge.

How to Chose the Right Single Edge Razor Blade

There are many single edge razor blades out there and the options can be overwhelming at times. Here is a quick do-it-yourself guide to choosing the right single edge razor for your business.

Start with the Basics:
If you are starting out fresh and need to choose a basic, popular, do-it-all razor try an uncoated 0.009″ single edge razor blade. Choose a blade constructed from carbon steel with an aluminum backing, a consistently popular combination for value price and high quality single edge blades. Companies that chose this type include manufacturing facilities, tint shops, wallpapering, janitorial, etc.

Double your Sharpness:
For businesses who like the basic blade shape and function, but want an even sharper cut, try stepping up to an extra keen razor. These blades are still 0.009″ thick and made with carbon steel, but are sent through the honing process twice for an even sharper blade. Businesses will often start with a basic razor and then swap when they find that they need that extra push. Extra keen, double honed, and extra sharp all mean the same thing for these razors.

Ultra Fine Cuts:
Some businesses find that stainless steel blades are the best option for their usage needs. Stainless steel is a more malleable metal than carbon steel. What this means for you is an even sharper first cut, but a slightly quicker dulling process than with carbon steel. It is worth noting that carbon steel razors are often more susceptible to rusting than stainless steel, since stainless metals contain less carbides. This makes stainless steel blades an excellent option for outdoor uses and storage or with cutting plants. Stainless steel blades usually come either coated or uncoated. Coatings are baked on and provide reduced friction and act as a rust inhibitor. Uncoated stainless steel blades are a better option in uses where extra grease would be a problem, such as paper or catheter cutting. Stainless Steel is not the right option for everyone, but when your work calls for super precise cuts such that even an extra sharp carbon steel blade won’t suffice, try a stainless option!

Heavy Duty Jobs:
Sometimes jobs require one of two types of extra duty razors. Businesses will either choose blades featuring heavy duty backings made of stainless steel or an extra thick razor with a 0.012″ thick blade instead of the standard 0.009″ thick blade. The stainless steel backed razor blades are your best bet when you find that the traditional aluminum backed blades are bending in use. On the other hand, you can opt for 0.012″ thick razor blades when you need a thicker blade for cutting, or need the blade to fit in a tool or machine for that size thickness.

Economy Options:
Many carbon steel razor blades are stropped and made of 1095 class Carbon Steel. These processes add to the quality, but also to the cost of the razor. If you are working on budget jobs where blade quality is not the number one factor, try less expensive razor blades made with 1074 steel and unstropped. There is a noticeable quality difference between stropped 1095 class blades and unstropped 1074 class blades, but for some jobs, such as warehouse or janitorial, these less expensive blades are a better option.

Special Circumstances and Clean Room Blades:
Some facilities necessitate blades certified for clean rooms with varied requirements. Clean Room classifications are ranked by ISO 14611-1 Standards and Federal Standard 209E classes. Be sure to know the exact class of razor you need to purchase before using blades in a clean room. Traditional blades are individually wrapped in cardboard which can leave fibers on the blade unsuitable for some clean room environments. Other clean rooms require blades to be degreased in a special washing step or vapor wash that rids the blade of all oils. Some clean room blades come in small plastic dispensers or pop-up dispensers for easy handling and to ensure a new, clean blade is always used. These types of blades are used in various sterile environments and are popular among businesses using blades for catheter cutting.

Although there seem to be many different single edge razor blade options available, most blades can be broken down into one or more of these six groups. By finding what qualities your business requires in a blade, you should be able to select the right blade every time.

Three Great Things About the Norelco Cool Skin Razor

Tired of razor burn? Try the Norelco cool skin razor. It’s designed to give you a nice smooth, clean shave with no irritation, no dryness, and no razor burn. Here are a few reasons why we think it’s the silver bullet to kill the Werewolf of razor burn…

-It’s easy to use

You may think that loading the lotion cartridges into the Norelco cool skin razor sounds a bit gimmicky, and a bit much to add to your daily morning routine. It’s really not, though, to be perfectly honest. Really it’s just a matter of snapping the cartridge into place and you’re good to go. The lotion dispenses itself as you shave, moisturizing your skin as you go to prevent dryness or razor burn. Not to mention, it’s a lot more convenient than shaving first and applying moisturizing lotion later. It allows you to moisturize and shave all at once so you don’t have to be one of those guys who spends an hour in front of the mirror every single morning.

-It sure beats those moisturizing strips on disposable razors

Those moisturizing strips don’t really work all that well, let’s be blunt about it. All they really accomplish is that they leave a thin layer of slickness on your skin as you shave, so now you have razor burn, your skin is dry, itchy and irritated, AND you feel like you just went bobbing for apples in a bowl of egg whites. It’s kind of icky! The moisturizing lotion that comes with the Norelco cool skin razor is nothing like that. It’s actually moisturizing, it actually does what it’s supposed to do, and it’s soothing, not slimy!

-It’s cheap!

The lotion cartridges last awhile, so even if you shave three times a day, it still winds up being much cheaper than using disposable plastic safety razors. Really, unless you’re shaving every hour on the hour, you’ll be surprised just how long these lotion cartridges will last you. And if you are shaving on an hourly basis, the cost of moisturizing lotion probably isn’t your biggest concern, and in fact, you’re probably too busy looking up “dermatologist” in the yellow pages to even be reading this article right now!

If you suffer razor burn, go ahead and make the switch to a good electric razor already! In particular, try the cool skin. It really works, it keeps you moisturized, it kills razor burn, and it’s no less convenient than any other electric shaver.